reuters:

A conversation between FBI special agents and authorities at the UK’s Scotland Yard was leaked online Friday morning, the latest in a series of data dumps conducted by Anonymous hackers to protest against law enforcement.
But the conference calls may have inadvertently released more information than the hacking collective would be comfortable with.
Read more: Details in leaked FBI call could prove uncomfortable for Anonymous

reuters:

A conversation between FBI special agents and authorities at the UK’s Scotland Yard was leaked online Friday morning, the latest in a series of data dumps conducted by Anonymous hackers to protest against law enforcement.

But the conference calls may have inadvertently released more information than the hacking collective would be comfortable with.

Read more: Details in leaked FBI call could prove uncomfortable for Anonymous

76 notes

Ambiguous Threats as a the cover story on the February 2012 issue of The ISSA Journal.

Ambiguous Threats as a the cover story on the February 2012 issue of The ISSA Journal.

Not all computer security threats are clear, and that is why many attacks are successful. This article helps to clarify what the real risks are in a risk or threat that initially appears ambiguous as to the danger.

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neurolove:

Since my last post about stress, I’ve gotten a lot of questions about what all stress does to the brain.  Stress has a lot of big, widespread effects on both the nervous system and the body.
Stress increases production of the hormones epinephrine (aka adrenaline) and norepinephrine (aka noradrenaline) and enhances activity of the sympathetic nervous system.  The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for “fight or flight” responses systemically and increases heart rate, dilates the lungs (so you can get more oxygen), increases blood pressure, etc.  All of the things your body would need to do to be able to run away quickly or put up a good fight.  It also decreases activity in parts of the body that aren’t as necessary to conserve energy- for instance, it decreases metabolism and the immune system. 
When all of these things happen short term, it’s actually good- you can put all your energy towards solving the problem that is making you stressed and respond to emergency situations better.  Long-term stress means you will put on more weight (due to decreased metabolism), be more prone to illness (due to suppressed immune system), have high blood pressure, etc.  This isn’t to say you want to prevent stress- it’s all about managing stress so that your body can use it appropriately.
[Image Source]

neurolove:

Since my last post about stress, I’ve gotten a lot of questions about what all stress does to the brain.  Stress has a lot of big, widespread effects on both the nervous system and the body.

Stress increases production of the hormones epinephrine (aka adrenaline) and norepinephrine (aka noradrenaline) and enhances activity of the sympathetic nervous system.  The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for “fight or flight” responses systemically and increases heart rate, dilates the lungs (so you can get more oxygen), increases blood pressure, etc.  All of the things your body would need to do to be able to run away quickly or put up a good fight.  It also decreases activity in parts of the body that aren’t as necessary to conserve energy- for instance, it decreases metabolism and the immune system. 

When all of these things happen short term, it’s actually good- you can put all your energy towards solving the problem that is making you stressed and respond to emergency situations better.  Long-term stress means you will put on more weight (due to decreased metabolism), be more prone to illness (due to suppressed immune system), have high blood pressure, etc.  This isn’t to say you want to prevent stress- it’s all about managing stress so that your body can use it appropriately.

[Image Source]

47 notes

Here’s the link to my investigative knol on Google (until Google shuts down knols in May 2012, lol).

Getting started

I’m just getting started here, but in the near future I’ll be posting a variety of thoughts and materials on the investigative process.  If you are interested in participating, I’d appreciate your feedback on the following issues:

  • Information overload - the effect on people in a digital society
  • Tracking cyber-criminals on the Web
  • Psychology - how it figures into protecting one’s self and one’s data online
  • Digital identity online - what is it from your perspective? 

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tumblrbot asked: ROBOTS OR DINOSAURS?

DINOSAURS

Ron Mendell teaches Information Security at Austin Community College in Austin,Texas.

Ron Mendell teaches Information Security at Austin Community College in Austin,Texas.

8 notes